What are Scope 1 Emissions? 

They are emissions that come from sources owned or controlled by an organisation.

What are Scope 1 Emissions?

Scope 1 emissions are greenhouse gas emissions released on an organisation’s site or from their vehicles.  More accurately they are CO2e emissions that come from sources are owned or controlled by an organisation. Typically these are emissions generated by gas boilers and owned or leased cars, vans & lorries.

If you want to simplify your Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions reporting click the link.

Scope 1 emissions are divided into four areas:

What are Scope 1 emissions - stationary combustion

Stationary Combustion

Sources include boilers for heating buildings, gas furnaces and gas-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plants. The most common fuels are natural gas, liquified petroleum gas (LPG), gas oil (aka red diesel) and burning oil (aka kerosene). All fuels that produce greenhouse gas emissions covered by the Kyoto Protocol must be included in the Scope 1 calculations.  They are also be included in the Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting requirements.

GHGi Analytics can calculate and report on the greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of all the relevant fuels, including the special considerations that are needed for bioenergy, blended fuels and ‘well-to-tank’ emissions.

Mobile Combustion

All vehicles owned or leased by an organisation that burn fuels producing greenhouse gases fall into Scope 1. Typically, these will be cars, vans, trucks and motorcycles powered by petrol or diesel engines. However, transport is changing. Alternative fuels, such as liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) are being adopted, as are the biofuels; bio-diesel and bio-ethanol. Full electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) are also becoming more popular. The increasing use of electric vehicles could mean that some of an organisation’s fleet will fall into Scope 2 emissions.  These must be included in the Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR). 

An added complication to GHG reporting can the nature of the vehicle lease. GHGi Analytics can calculate and allocate the appropriate GHG emissions to the correct Scope for reporting. It also takes into account emissions associated with EV’s and PHEVs, as well as ‘well-to-tank’ emissions.

What are Scope 1 emissions - Transport

What are Scope 1 emissions - fugitive emissions

Fugitive Emissions

What are Scope 1 emissions in relation to fugitive emissions?  Fugitive emissions are leaks of greenhouse gases, for example from refrigeration and air-conditioning units. Refrigerant gases are generally extremely potent greenhouse gases, some of which are thousands of times more damaging than carbon dioxide (CO2).  Reporting these emissions are required for quoted companies under the UK government’s Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR) regulations. However, large unquoted companies and large LLPs, although not required to report these emissions, are encouraged to do so.

GHGi Analytics can calculate and report on all the greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto and Montreal Protocols.

Process Emissions

What are Scope 1 emissions as far as process are concerned. These are emissions release into the atmosphere during industrial processes, for example the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of cement manufacturing.  Reporting these emissions are required for quoted companies under the UK government’s Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR) regulations. However, large unquoted companies and large LLPs, although not required to report these emissions, are encouraged to do so.

GHGi Analytics can calculate and report on all the greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto and Montreal Protocols.

What are Scope 1 emissions - cement factory

GHGi Analytics is a cloud based solution. It enables you to easily collect and analyse your greenhouse gas emissions. It also simplifies your Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions reporting. Click the following link to see how GHGi Analytics records an organisation’s Scope 1 emissions.

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